Handy Glia

Speaker: Dr. Anthony Blikslager, DVM, PhD, DACVS, from NC State

Title: "Do enteric glial cells play a role in age dependent mucosal repair?"

 

Summary: Dr. Anthony Blikslager is a Professor of Equine Surgery and Gastroenterology at NC State University. His lab’s focus is gastrointestinal physiology, specifically studying repair of the intestinal barrier and its role in healing in diseases like strangulating obstruction in animals and necrotizing enterocolitis in human newborns. In studying this intestinal barrier, Dr. Blikslager and his team found that prostaglandins stimulate the recovery of tight junctions in injured juvenile intestine. In the presence of a prostaglandin inhibitor, epithelial cells can repair but the tight junctions cannot, resulting in a leaky barrier. They also found an age dependence in barrier repair; younger mammals have greater difficult repairing their intestinal barrier. In newborns, epithelial restitution is arrested after ischemic injury. Using scanning electron microscopy, they have observed a different morphology in newborn and juvenile epithelial tissue. Neonatal epithelial tissue is rounded whereas juvenile tissue flattens out. The reason behind this remains unknown. To help answer this question, the lab has started to investigate the role of enteric glial cells in the healing process. They hypothesize that glial cells signal epithelial restitution. Further, they hypothesize that oligosaccharides feed the microbiota which in turns signals glial cells to support this restitution. Initial studies suggest that the enteric glial cell network is underdeveloped in neonates. Additionally, data show that feeding oligosaccharides results in both a maturation of the enteric glial cell network and a positive shift in the microbiome. These preliminary results suggest a temporal link to development of enteric glial cells, and define them as a potential target in intestinal barrier repair.